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“Time To Eat” is the 5th book in Nadiya Hussain’s book series and it accompanies the BBC tv show by the same name. like countless shows and books previous, it promises 5 minute feasts and perfect meal time solutions for time-poor people, the difference being Nadiya delivers!

 

It would be misleading to say that every recipe is top draw. The technical difficulty of the recipes varies quite drastically, as does the style of food from dish to dish. there are recipes from England, China, Mexico, Bangladesh, India and Japan to name a few. Meaning it has something for everyone at every level. 

 

The recipes in this book are more of education in how to run a home kitchen, with recipes that help you both save money and time. Each recipe comes with brilliant tips on storage, bulk batching and great suggestions on how to use the left overs.

 

The recipes themselves cleverly utilize both fresh and convenience foods, making use of ingredients that we all have in the house dried, frozen and tinned food along with fresh ingredients to create some truly unique recipes. The Baked bean falafel is a particular favourite of mine

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This is normally this the part where I tell you about our author, but I want to let Nadiya tell you in her own words. 

Below is a few excerpts I have lifted from her site (nadiyahussain.com) but go to the “about me” section for a more in-depth look at her life.

 
 

“I was born in Luton in 1984, on Christmas Day. That was my claim to fame when I was younger. People often say so on the same day you celebrate your birthday and Jesus’ birthday’? ‘Yes they do’ is my answer.”

“I grew up in a house with my mum and dad, and 5 siblings. Believe me, being one of six kept our home lively. I have two older sisters, a younger sister and 2 younger brothers. There was always someone to talk to. There was always someone to fight with.”

“Abdal and I got married in the summer of 2005 and moved from my home in Luton to Leeds. My only regret was that I should have checked on a map how far Leeds really was from Luton.”

“I decided to do an Open University degree I baked my way through my degree on my path to become a social worker.”

“I remember forcing my husband to sit through tons of cookery shows and despite the grimace on his face, he did what all good husbands do, he told me he’s only watching because there’s nothing else on the Tele. He would sit through each episode and shout at the box ‘Nadiya you can do that’! And I would ignore him.”

“One day he presented me with a downloaded application form for the Great British Bake Off Series 6. I gave him one look and said ‘no way’.”

“For over 20 years I suffered with panic disorder and he was the one who saw the worst of it, the lowest of the low. He was the one who propped me up every time I willed myself to fail. ‘I think you should do this.’ He said. ‘Your wings were clipped somewhere along the way but I think it’s time for you to fly’. So I entered Bake Off because he was right. I had lost myself in the madness that is life, I was everything, a daughter, a sister, a wife a mother but I still was nowhere near finding me.”

“Every week I filmed and every week I thought I was the next one to leave. There were some near misses but somehow in the blink of an eye, there I was in the final. But when they announced that I’d won the Great British Bake Off 2015, it all became a blur. All I remember is handing the trophy back to Paul and saying ‘are you sure you haven’t made a mistake?’”

 
 
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Baked Bean Falafel

I picked this purely for the novelty of using baked beans for something other than beans on toast. Nadiya serves them with a soft roll but I much prefer a nice toasted flat bread! it just works so much better. The sauce is incredible worth the entrance fee alone.

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Baked Bean Falafel

I picked this purely for the novelty of using baked beans for something other than beans on toast. Nadiya serves them with a soft roll but I much prefer a nice toasted flat bread! it just works so much better. The sauce is incredible worth the entrance fee alone.

 
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Hazelnut and Chocolate Mousse

If you like nutella, you will love this mousse. The toasted hazelnuts are a really good contrast in texture against the mousse. I added some fresh fruit to break it up a little.

The cornflour stabilises the mousse so it won't break down in the fridge. if you fold in some whipped egg whites you can freeze it and have a great chocolate nutella ice-cream 

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Hazelnut and Chocolate Mousse

If you like nutella, you will love this mousse. The toasted hazelnuts are a really good contrast in texture against the mousse. I added some fresh fruit to break it up a little.

The cornflour stabilises the mousse so it won't break down in the fridge. if fold in some whipped egg whites you can freeze it and have a great chocolate butella ice-cream 

 
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Frozen Eclair Pops

This is on the higher end of the technical scale for this book, there are a lot of techniques involved and they take a little time but they ae worth it and last a couple of months in the freezer.

The choux pastry recipe for these eclairs is great, again the cornflour in the filling stabilizes it so it can be put in the freezer. eaten straight from the freezer they are a little hard but after a couple of minutes its like eating an eclair filled with raspberry ripple ice-cream.

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Frozen Eclair Pops

This is on the higher end of the technical scale for this book, there are a lot of techniques involved and they take a little time but they ae worth it and last a couple of months in the freezer.

The choux pastry recipe for these eclairs is great, again the cornflour in the filling stabilizes it so it can be put in the freezer. eaten straight from the freezer they are a little hard but after a couple of minutes its like eating an eclair filled with raspberry ripple ice-cream.

 
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Grandma's Curry

The recipe starts with a large batch of the curry paste that can be frozen for a later date. It is essentially a Thai version of a indian korma, I had to add a little more chilli, which can be added to the paste if you prefer, or adding a bit of siracha at the end is a good option.

It's quick and easy recipe which helps you plan future meals.

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Grandma's Curry

The recipe starts with a large batch of the curry paste that can be frozen for a later date. It is essentially a Thai version of a indian korma, I had to add a little more chilli, which can be added to the paste if you prefer, or adding a bit of siracha at the end is a good option.

It's quick and easy recipe which helps you plan future meals.

 
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Tomato and Parmesan Flatbread

These are great to get the kids involved in, the dough is easy enough to make and cook. They are essentially a mini pizza, you brush them with butter as you fry them in a pan so dabbing them on kitchen roll afterwards is probably a good idea. the dip compliments the bread perfectly, if you can't be bothered to make it the garlic and herb philidelphia is almost identical

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Tomato and Parmesan Flatbread

These are great to get the kids involved in, the dough is easy enough and cook. They are essentially a mini pizza, you brush them with butter as you fry them in a pan so dabbing them on kitchen roll afterwards is probably a good idea. the dip compliments the bread perfectly, if you can't be bothered to make it the garlic and herb philidelphia is almost identical.

 
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Olive and Blue Cheese Crown

The actual bread is very simple to make, but the twisting and plaiting takes practise as you can probably tell from the picture.

I subsititued the blue cheese for a smoked cheddar and added some chopped bacon,  it was a great addition and went really well with the apricot glaze

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Olive and Blue Cheese Crown

The actual bread is very simple to make, but the twisting and plaiting takes practise as you can probably tell from the picture.

I subsititued the blue cheese for a smoked cheddar and added some chopped bacon,  it was a great addition and went really well with the apricot glaze

 

Sample Recipe

I don’t know about you, but we always have baked beans in the cupboard so this is a great recipe for if you want to try something different with them. It might sound like an unusual recipe . . . you’re just going to have to trust me on this one! If you also like coleslaw, double up the sauce ingredients and pop the extra ingredients on your shopping list.

 

For the falafel:

4 x 400g Tins of baked beans

1 Large egg

6 Cloves of garlic, crushed

1 Large onion, chopped

1 tsp Salt

1 tsp Chilli powder

1 tbsp Ground cumin

1 tbsp Ground coriander

120g Chickpea flour

A large handful of fresh parsley, finely chopped

 

For the sauce:

1 Clove of garlic, grated

1 tsp Salt

4 tbsp Mayonnaise

a squeeze of lemon juice

1 tbsp Chopped fresh parsley

2 tbsp Sriracha sauce

For the coleslaw (optional extra):

3 Carrots, grated

½ White cabbage, finely shredded

½ Red cabbage, finely shredded

1 Red onion, thinly sliced

 
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Instructions

1. Preheat the oven to 220°C/fan 200°C and have a large baking tray ready, generously greased.

 

2. Drain the beans, keeping the sauce aside in a separate bowl. Then rinse the beans and leave them to drain.

 

3. Put the beans and the egg into a blender and blend until you have a smooth paste. Transfer to a bowl and add the garlic, onion, salt, chilli powder, cumin and coriander. Add the chickpea flour and mix everything together – it may be quite a wet mix.

 

4. Using oiled hands, create small balls of the bean mixture and pop them on the tray. Spray them with oil all over and bake in the oven for 25–30 minutes, turning them halfway through.

 

5. To make the sauce, add the garlic, salt, mayonnaise, lemon juice and parsley to 150g of the drained bean sauce from the tin. Stir and set aside.

If you don’t want to waste the rest of the bean juice, double up the sauce ingredients to make a double batch of it. Use half as a dipping sauce for the falafel. Stir the other half through the coleslaw ingredients listed.

 

6. They are best served in a toasted tortilla wrap with the crunchy coleslaw

 

 

 

 

 

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Her career has been transformed since her successful run in the bake off tent. The former stay at home mum of three has proven that anyone can rise to the top. She her own TV cookery series Nadiya's British Food Adventure She's a columnist for The Times, has signed publishing deals where she has penned 10 books to date, 6 of them are cookery books and even baked a cake for the Queen's 90th birthday!

Many female celebrity chefs have graced our screens since the dawn of television. Only people of a certain age will remember the “charmingly bizarre” Fanny Cradock. In 1955 the “imperious battle-axe” hosted a cookery show at a time when cooking at home was only done by women, millions of people swore by her recipes, some even credited their desire and ability to cook to watching her on the box. 

She is also the start of the UK’s fascination with hot headed celebrity chefs on TV, such as Keith Lloyd and Gordon Ramsay. Like Ramsey her show became more about her personality than her cooking. Some people even had nightmares of being chased by her through Harrods. 

Thankfully, Nadiya Hussain is one of those TV personalities that is helping our country rid itself of this macabre idea of chefs. She does however have one advantage over her predecessors and peers, that is relatability. 

When I think of the likes of Mary, Nigella and Delia, whilst I do love them! I do see them as quite rigid, middle class cooks who predominantly teach how to cater for date nights, special occasions and dinner parties. Nadiya instructs the world on the wonderful everyday with infectious joy and unbound enthusiasm. She embodies all that is great about the  contempory British food scene. Her food is decidedly British and modern but she incorporates classic flavours and techniques from all over the world including Thai, Bangladeshi and Japanese cuisines with incredible imagination and unabashed flair.

Over the years there has been some amazing female celebrity chefs who have attempted and many have succeeded in picking up the mantel as the culinary queen of British TV. Mary Berry, Delia Smith & Nigella Lawson would definitely be on the mount Rushmore of female celebrity chefs. But with the emergence of Nadiya, I think it’s now time to pass that mantel on again and add one more face to that Pantheon of cooking deities. 

 

Time to eat is available as a Ebook or in hardback via Amazon and is an absolute steal at around £11.99